KONSHENS YUH STRONG UP…OUR CONDOLENCES

14 thoughts on “KONSHENS YUH STRONG UP…OUR CONDOLENCES

  1. ?? Him glad him escape what did a pressure him? How you fi say that bout you bredda dawg? Smh, turn unu soul over to God and stop mix up wid the devil, all nuff a dem people ina the dancehall love use each other as sacrifice, i believe J Capri and Delus were used as sacrifice

    1. Oh SHUT THE F**K UP you dumb f**k and stop taking what the man is saying out of context. People like you haffi always come wid some f**y. The man had his issues. His brother is basically saying he is no longer suffering. Move yuh bbc from yasso man bout sacrifice KMFT

  2. My condolences to you and your family Mr konshens…I know you feel down right now but to live is to suffer..just keep doing your thing because the work have to be done..

  3. Just hold it breddah, I don’t know how you feeling and I selfishly pray I never do. Grief however way you want to because you are entitled to.

  4. So true @ my two cents. The endless speculations need to stop and give the family the respect and privacy to grieve their love one.

  5. To: KONSHENS & Family

    I am with you

    Experiencing the suicide of someone you love will put you in a place where all you can do is cry out to God, the only one who can untie the things that are all knotted together and the only one who can tie up things that are dangling loose.

    The tragedy of suicide doesn’t have to tear relationships apart. Family can pull together more tightly, and friendships can become deeper as you cling to each other in the face of how hard life is.

    Don’t try to go down the dark path of life’s tough realities without clinging to others.

    These relationships will always remind you of the empty chair—the person who’s not here. But genuine human community/companionship is one of God’s greatest weapons against the isolation, despair, and implicit hostility that are a part of a suicidal act. Pray with and for each other as you grieve.

    Live fruitfully. It’s important at this time that you don’t neglect the basics of life. Your food might not have much taste, but you need to eat.

    You may not feel like getting out of bed in the morning, but you need to get up and get dressed. You might have no interest in your work, but you need to keep going.

    Give yourself a week or so, but then get back to normal living. Doing these things makes the statement that life continues despite what has happened.

    Nothing will bring your friend, relative, or coworker back. But you can become a wiser friend, more willing to take a risk and step in when you see something that’s hard.

    God will use what you are going through now to give you wisdom and tenderness as you reach out to others who are suffering.

    Where else will you go? Who is bigger than the things in your heart that are tied in knots or dangling loose?

    After all the struggling to make sense, after all the sickening grief at the finality of the act, after all the anger at the betrayal, at a fundamental level you must be able to say, “I do not understand this and I must leave it with you, my God and my King.”

    God explains it this way, “Blessed is the man who trusts in the LORD, whose trust is the LORD. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit.” (Jeremiah 17:7-8)

    Jeremiah is talking about living in a desert where life is hard and brutal. The desert in the Bible is the place of death— there is no water, no food, and it’s full of poisonous snakes.

    God’s living water is His presence. He says, “I am with you.” He is the only one who can reassure your heart.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top